ARC Book Review: In the Quiet by Eliza Henry-Jones

intothequiet

ashley | The description of In the Quiet by Eliza Henry-Jones sounded very intriguing, but a part of me was hesitant to pick this up before it’s North American release (today!). For it to really get to me, the writing had to be strong, the characters would have to pull on my heart strings and I would have to somehow connect with the lead character. This hasn’t been a winning combination for me lately, but I could tell within the first few pages that this family, this family was going to get under my skin and make me feel the depths of their love and their grief and all it is that made them a family.
There’s so much beauty in this book, even though it’s primarily about loss and grief. I literally felt my heart break every time we witnessed the kids doing something soft and out of character to make their sibling feel a little better or a little stronger or a little more normal. They were really small things, like letting them win a game or cheering for them in a race or just comforting them in a time of need, but that is what cut me deep, that essence of family and how family puts everything else aside to offer their small presence just so it’s known they aren’t all alone in this.
I fell so much in love with these characters. They were all so fiercely unique, but fiercely loyal. Their surrounding friends so selflessly helpful. I really loved how they weren’t a perfect family, there were flaws, there were money troubles, there were hardships and things kept growing a little bit darker with the more memories that were unraveled and the more we learned. But they made do, did well with what they had and I think, without even realizing it, they knew that what really mattered were those people around them. 
I liked how you don’t know a lot of the details of our narrator’s death through the book, but it isn’t written in a way that you’re dying to know. If we didn’t find out towards the end, I’d probably still be okay with the ending. But it really is what drew everyone together, what set them off wailing in these directions, so it was good to see everything come full circle in the end. I also really loved the conflicting emotion the narrator had, seeing her family move on without her, happy that they are but sad that she isn’t there to witness it herself. It was a beautifully blended balance and it seemed incredibly realistic for a situation like that. Very human, very real.
This book made me want to cry with pretty much every scene. It’s been a really long time since something has reached me on such a level. I’ve read books like this before, books about people trying to deal with their grief after their life is turned upside down when someone dies, but none of them have ever been quite like this. Henry-Jones does something magical with this and it really got to me on a very deep level. It makes me really sad to have to let them go.
5CityGirlScapesRating
more information
amazongoodreads website Harper Collins
available
today! april 11, 2017
copy provided for honest review by
edelweiss
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